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  1. HomeShop.
    WEAR. issue 2

    Our Price:  $19.50

    Published: HomeShop (2010)
    Details: Softcover, 168 pages, 215 x 276 mm
    Languages: English & simplified Chinese

    Edition of 500 copies

    "What is cultural exchange? Have you ever heard of this phrase, 'cultural exchange'?
    Difficult to say. I don't know.

    You don't know what cultural exchange is? Never heard of this phrase?
    Nope."

    The second edition of WEAR, subtitled “Cultural Exchange”, includes documentation and commentary on the varied activities of HomeShop, a unique artists’ collective based in Beijing from 2008-2013. Issue two includes contributions by the curator and cultural commentator Carol Lu, RAQS Media Collective, from India, and the artists Meiya Lin and Michael Eddy and features a specially created 28-page insert by the Belgian artist Reinaart Vanhoe.

    WEAR is the independently published journal of HomeShop, which was co-founded in 2008 by the Chinese-American artist Elaine Ho and the Beijing-based artist Xiao Ou Yang. The annual journal combines an artist book and theoretical reader and documents the public activities, discussions, social research and interventions conducted at HomeShop, as well as contributions by artists, writers and residents in the local neighbourhood.

    The Contributors
    Anouchka van Driel (Netherlands), Michael Eddy (Canada/USA), Barbara Fang 方丹敏 (China), Beatrice Ferrari (Switzerland), Gao Bei 高蓓 (China), Elaine W. Ho 何颖雅 (Hong Kong/USA), Instant Hutong (Italy), Fotini Lazaridou-Hatzigoga, (Germany), Liang Shuo 梁硕 (China), Meiya Lin 林美雅 (China), Carol Yinghua Lu 卢迎华 (China), Mai Dian 麦巅 (China), Qu Yizhen 曲一箴 (China), RAQS Media Collective (India), Claude Tao 陶醉 (China), Reinaart Vanhoe (Belgium), Yan Teng 颜腾 (China).

    About HomeShop
    HomeShop began in 2008 as a storefront residence and artist initiative in Beijing. Located in the centre of the city in one of its old hutong alleyways, its interior space and shop front windows were used as jumping-off points to explore different forms of communication and interaction with the immediate community. The project sparked a variety of interlinked small-scale projects that often converged on issues of public and private and the micro-politics of daily life in the local neighbourhood. In 2010 HomeShop moved to a second space at the Jiaodaokou Beiertiao hutong, also in Beijing. HomeShop finally closed in December 2013.

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